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Something Wild

From the many birds that call our state home, to the trees around New Hampshire that have been granted "Big Tree" status, to stone walls that punctuate the state, we explain the behavior and science behind what we see and hear (and might take for granted) in our backyards.

  • Something Wild: Sy & the orphan hummingbirds
    N.H. naturalist and author Sy Montgomery had the rare experience of helping to raise two orphaned baby hummingbirds. We get a peek into the complex endeavor, and the strength Sy finds in these tiny birds, in our second episode in the series: “A glimpse into the heart, soul, and science of animals with Sy Montgomery."
  • Something Wild: Sy & the turtle hatchlings
    There are fewer than 3000 Blanding’s turtles in the northeast. We spend some time with NH naturalist and author Sy Montgomery to learn how she’s helping to give the endangered turtles a head start.
  • Something Wild: How to remember bird songs
    Learning bird songs and calls links you to a kind of birding folklore passed down from generations of birders. How many can you identify?
  • Something Wild: Trout are made of trees
    When we go fishing, we rarely think about trees contributing anything beyond shade. But the more wood in a stream, the more trout there are and the bigger those trout become.
  • Something Wild: Is this Salamander a Plant or Animal? Yes.
    Have you checked out a vernal pool this spring? The Something Wild team discovers the surprising symbiotic relationship between salamanders and algae.
  • Something Wild: Extreme weather is both a disaster and an opportunity
    Heavy, wet April snow in New Hampshire snapped off saplings and uprooted trees. But in nature, disasters caused by all sorts of extreme weather are often followed by opportunities.
  • Something Wild: Extreme weather is both a disaster and an opportunity
    Heavy, wet April snow snapped off saplings and uprooted trees in the state. But in nature, damage caused by all sorts of extreme weather is often followed by opportunities.
  • Something Wild: Peepers, The Unmistakable Sound of Spring
    Spring peepers spend the winter under leaf litter in a state of suspended animation. Once overnight temperatures are regularly in the 40s, they start thawing out and begin singing.
  • Something Wild: How will animals react during the total solar eclipse?
    With spring migration underway, scientists are eager to study how birds, and wildlife in general, will react to this year’s total eclipse. Research from the 2017 eclipse suggests some things to look for in N.H. on April 8, 2024.
  • Something Wild: Why our lakes need ice
    Cold, clear lakes require the winter reset provided by long-lasting winter ice. Beyond the winter tourism of ice-fishing and pond hockey, ice is a crucial part of the ecological health of our living lakes.
  • Something Wild: Are birdfeeders for the birds - or us?
    As little as six minutes of listening to bird song has been shown to reduce anxiety. No wonder an estimated 50 million people enjoy feeding feathered friends at a bird feeder. But who really benefits from feeding birds?
  • Something Wild: Are birdfeeders for the birds - or us?
    Listening to as little as six minutes of bird song has been shown to reduce anxiety. No wonder an estimated 50 million people enjoy feeding feathered friends at a bird feeder. But who really benefits from feeding birds?