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Disrupted
Wednesdays & Sundays 2:00 PM, available as a podcast

Disruptions are all around us. Some spark joy and possibility. Others move us to take action and re-evaluate our world. Every week on Disrupted, host and political scientist Khalilah Brown-Dean unpacks how big and small disruptions are shaping our lives.

  • This hour, for Valentine's Day, we are taking a look at friendship. While friends seem ubiquitous in our culture, they aren't often prioritized in the same way that romantic partners are. Rhaina Cohen discusses that topic in her new book 'The Other Significant Others: Reimagining Life with Friendship at the Center.' Then, we turn to the idea of having friends from different generations. We'll hear from two Quinnipiac University students who live with the residents of Pond Ridge at Ashlar Village, a retirement community in Wallingford, CT. And Eunice Lin Nichols, Co-CEO of CoGenerate, will explain the value of intergenerational connections, including how they can help in a polarized society. GUESTS: Rhaina Cohen: Producer and editor for NPR. Author of 'The Other Significant Others: Reimagining Life with Friendship at the Center' Elise Maiorano: first year grad student at Quinnipiac University studying occupational therapy and living at Pond Ridge at Ashlar Village, a retirement community Annemarie Allen: first year grad student at Quinnipiac University studying occupational therapy and living at Pond Ridge at Ashlar Village, a retirement community Ben Paige: Resident of Pond Ridge at Ashlar Village, the retirement community that Elise and Annemarie stay at Eunice Lin Nichols: Co-CEO of CoGenerate, an organization that brings people from different generations together to solve problems See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • This hour on Disrupted, we discuss the First Amendment and its impact on higher education. College campuses are in the spotlight as students have continued to hold protests since the start of the Israel-Hamas war. There have been allegations of antisemitic, anti-Muslim, and anti-Palestinian speech at some protests — and that’s left many wondering how to address harmful speech without curbing free expression. First Amendment Specialist Kevin Goldberg explains the five protections covered in the amendment. Wesleyan University President Michael Roth talks about his role as a university administrator and how to provide safe spaces for students. Connecticut college students will share their thoughts on free speech. GUESTS: Kevin Goldberg: First Amendment Specialist, Freedom Forum. Michael Roth: President, Wesleyan University and author of Safe Enough Spaces: A Pragmatist’s Approach to Inclusion, Free Speech, and Political Correctness. Elle: Student, Yale University Thomas: Student, University of New Haven AJ: Student, University of New Haven See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • In a new essay, NPR host Ayesha Rascoe writes about how Howard University helped shape her into the person she is today. The essay is part of a collection that she edited called 'HBCU Made: A Celebration of the Black College Experience' and features contributors like Oprah Winfrey, Stacey Abrams and comedian Roy Wood Jr. This hour, she tells us about the book and her career, discussing everything from self doubt to sounding different from the hosts that NPR listeners are used to. GUEST: Ayesha Rascoe: host of NPR’s 'Weekend Edition Sunday' and one of the hosts of 'Up First.' She edited and wrote the introduction to the new book 'HBCU Made: A Celebration of the Black College Experience' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • Black news outlets have long shed light on important stories ignored by other organizations. This hour, we’re taking an in depth look at the Black press. Professor Trevy A. McDonald tells us about the role the Black press played during important moments in history such as the civil rights movement. Akoto Ofori-Atta of Capital B explains her goals in helping to create a non-profit newsroom dedicated to centering Black voices. And Sasha Allen Walton and Endera Allen Stevens talk about working at Connecticut's largest and longest-published Black newspaper. You can learn more about Capital B at their website here or sign up for their newsletter here. You can learn more about Northend Agent's at their website here. GUESTS: Trevy A. McDonald: Associate Dean of ABIDE (Access, Belonging, Inclusion, Diversity, & Equity); Associate Professor of Broadcast and Electronic Journalism; Author; owner of Reyomi Media Group, an independent book publishing and consulting company based in Durham, N.C. Akoto Ofori-Atta: Co-founder and Chief Audience Officer at Capital B Sasha Allen Walton: Editor-in-Chief at Northend Agent’s Endera Allen Stevens: Growth Manager for Northend Agent’s This episode originally aired on June 7, 2023. Disrupted is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Spotify, Google Podcasts, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • This hour, we explore Connecticut music. Violinist Kersten Stevens just released a jazz album that she worked on with eight-time Grammy winner Christian McBride. She talks to us about facing imposter syndrome and how her unique sound came out of her experience playing a wide range of genres while growing up in Connecticut. Qiana Coachman-Strickland, also known as "DJ Q-Boogie," discusses her work supporting women DJs as Owner and Founder of Female DJ Association. And filmmakers Andy Billman and Joe Franco tell us about their upcoming documentary on music venue Toad's Place in New Haven. GUESTS: Kersten Stevens: violinist with the nickname “Queen of the Violin.” She’s won Amateur Night and Showtime at the Apollo a total of six times. She plays in a range of styles, but her latest album, Queen Rising, is jazz. Qiana Coachman-Strickland aka DJ Q-Boogie: professional DJ, Female DJ Coach and Owner and Founder of Female DJ Association. Qiana is based in Connecticut. Andy Billman: director of the upcoming documentary on New Haven music venue Toad’s Place. He has worked on a number of projects for ESPN, including the award-winning series 30 for 30. Joe Franco: one of the producers of the upcoming documentary on New Haven music venue Toad’s Place. He worked at ESPN from the very first year it launched and spent over 30 years there doing everything from covering sporting events to working in HR. Special thanks this week to Meg Fitzgerald.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • The Disrupted team has been welcoming the new year by choosing a few of the episodes we loved from 2023. We have so many favorites that we couldn't reair all of them, but these are a few that we wanted to listen back to. This week is the last of our "2023 favorites" episodes. Producer Kevin Chang Barnum chose our episode on Chinese American exclusion and resistance not only because of how it highlights the discrimination that Chinese Americans face, but also because it shows something that isn't covered enough in the media— the way Chinese Americans have fought against that discrimination. This hour, Ava Chin discusses how the Chinese Exclusion Act continues to impact people today as we interview her about her book 'Mott Street: A Chinese American Family's Story of Exclusion and Homecoming.' And Russell Jeung, one of the co-founders of Stop AAPI Hate, talks about the historical precedent for the current wave of anti-Asian racism and how people who oppose it can take action. GUESTS: Ava Chin: Professor of Creative Nonfiction and Journalism at the City University of New York Graduate Center and College of Staten Island. Her most recent book is Mott Street: A Chinese American Family’s Story of Exclusion and Homecoming Russell Jeung: Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University and a Co-Founder of Stop AAPI Hate. In 2021, he was named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World along with his fellow Stop AAPI Hate co-founders This episode originally aired on September 13, 2023.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • The Disrupted team is welcoming the new year by choosing a few of the episodes we loved from 2023. We have so many favorites that we couldn't reair all of them, but these are a few that we wanted to listen back to. This week, Producer Wayne Edwards chose our episode on media literacy. We look at how media is understood across generations and why media literacy is more than just identifying misinformation on the news or social media. Global media literacy educator Dr. Belinha De Abreu talks about the evolving relationship between people and the platforms they use. She also explains Connecticut's policy surrounding media literacy education. Later in the show, we hear a roundtable discussion with college journalism students as we learn how they approach finding accurate news. GUESTS: Dr. Belinha De Abreu: President of the International Council for Media Literacy and professor at Sacred Heart University; author of over 13 books including, most recently, “Media Literacy for Justice: Lessons for Changing the World” Tyler Wells: senior journalism major at the University of New Haven, Editor-in-Chief of The Charger Bulletin campus newspaper Faith Arcuri: junior at the University of New Haven majoring in journalism who writes for The Charger Bulletin Julie Dunn: junior at Sacred Heart University majoring in media arts with a concentration of TV, film and media Colin Moura: sophomore at Sacred Heart University majoring in media arts, Photography Editor of campus newspaper The Spectrum Special thanks to our interns Melody Rivera and Elizabeth Van Arnam who hosted the roundtable discussion. This episode originally aired April 5, 2023.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • The Disrupted team is welcoming the new year by choosing a few of the episodes we loved from 2023. We have so many favorites that we couldn't reair all of them, but these are a few that we wanted to listen back to. This week, our host Khalilah Brown-Dean chose our episode on how race has impacted agriculture and the environmental movement. Leah Penniman, Co-Executive Director and Farm Director at Soul Fire Farm, talks about her new book Black Earth Wisdom: Soulful Conversations with Black Environmentalists. The discussion touches on everything from Leah's childhood to how the creation of some of the most prominent national parks in the U.S. is linked to the eugenics movement. And Dr. Dorceta Taylor, a professor at the Yale School of the Environment, explains what environmental justice is, and why we need to think about marginalized communities when we think about the environment. For more information on Soul Fire Farm, you can visit their website. You can read Dorceta Taylor's research on disparities in environmental grantmakng through ResearchGate. GUESTS: Leah Penniman: Co-Executive Director and Farm Director at Soul Fire Farm, author of Black Earth Wisdom: Soulful Conversations with Black Environmentalists. Dorceta Taylor: Professor and Senior Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Yale School of the Environment. She was interviewed for Leah Penniman’s book Black Earth Wisdom and is author of multiple books herself, including The Rise of the American Conservation Movement: Power, Privilege, and Environmental Protection. This episode originally aired on April 26, 2023.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • A recent report found that one in five young people in Connecticut is dealing with challenges like disconnection from education and employment, being at-risk of not graduating high school and incarceration. This hour, we take a closer look at that report. First, Andrew Ferguson walks us through the numbers. He is Co-CEO of Dalio Education, the organization that commissioned Boston Consulting Group to create the report. Then, we talk to young people in the state about what it's like to grow up in Connecticut. You can find the report, "Connecticut's Unspoken Crisis," on Dalio Education's website. The panel discussion clips in this episode are from a public awareness campaign organized by the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities (CCM). You can watch the full panel discussion featuring Joshua Brown from Domus and Mayor Luke Bronin on CCM's Facebook page. GUESTS: Andrew Ferguson: Co-CEO of Dalio Education. Dalio Education is the organization that commissioned Boston Consulting Group to create the report "Connecticut's Unspoken Crisis." He has also worked as an elementary school teacher in New Haven. Yaismely Segura: student at Stamford High School. Since fifth grade, she has taken part in programs at Domus, a Stamford-based organization that works to engage and support youth. Diego Felix: grew up in Hartford and was part of the Youth Service Corps at Our Piece of the Pie (OPP), a Hartford-based non-profit that educates and trains young people See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • This hour, we talk to people who are disrupting the way we think about parenting. Mr. Chazz has hundreds of thousands of followers on TikTok and Instagram. He tells us how social media can be used to break generational cycles of unhealthy parenting behaviors. And cultural developmental psychologist Nandita Chaudhary discusses her realization that the developmental psychology she was studying didn't reflect childhood in India, where she grew up. GUESTS: Mr. Chazz: teacher; social media content creator and host of 'Mr. Chazz’s Leadership, Parenting & Teaching Podcast.' Nandita Chaudhary: independent scholar and visiting professor at the Federal University of Bahia in Brazil. She studies cultural development psychology. Our intern Lateshia Peters helped produce this episode. Special thanks to our intern Joey Morgan.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • As we gather with friends, family or co-workers, questions about social courtesies may arise. This hour on Disrupted, we learn holiday etiquette tips from lifestyle and etiquette expert Terri Bryant. Christmas, Hanukkah, and Kwanzaa are the more recognizable holidays of this season, but have you heard of or celebrated Bodhi Day or Pancha Ganapati? Dr. Aaron M. Gale educates us about religious holidays celebrated worldwide during the winter months. According to people.com, 2023’s holiday-themed film lineup will feature over 100 movies on broadcast and streaming platforms. Journalist Philiana Ng joins us to discuss this season's “must-see” holiday movies. You’ll even hear host Khalilah Brown-Dean share her go-to holiday classic. GUEST: Terri Bryant: Lifestyle and Etiquette expert. Owner, The Swann School of Protocol - Bridgeport Dr. Aaron M. Gale: Associate Professor of Religious Studies, West Virginia University Philiana Ng: Entertainment and Television Journalist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  • On November 14th, Disrupted held a live event at Quinnipiac University to talk with leaders from across our state about the economic inequities that women face. The discussion focused on housing, childcare and economic mobility and coincided with the release of a report titled "Elusive Equity: Continuing Effects of the Pandemic on Women’s Economic Security.” First, Michelle Riordan-Nold of CTData Collaborative and Jenny Steadman of Aurora Women and Girls Foundation spoke about the findings of the report. Then, Jenny Steadman of Aurora Women and Girls Foundation, Karen DuBois-Walton of Elm City Communities, Emily Byrne of Connecticut Voices for Children and Karen Lott of the Women’s League Child Development Center talked about potential solutions to the issues women are facing. The report was created by CTData Collaborative and funded by Aurora Women and Girls Foundation and The Community Fund for Women and Girls of the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. To read the report, you can go to CTData Collaborative's website. GUESTS: Michelle Riordan-Nold: Executive Director of CTData Collaborative Jenny Steadman: Executive Director of Aurora Women and Girls Foundation Karen DuBois-Walton: President of Elm City Communities Emily Byrne: Executive Director of Connecticut Voices for Children Karen Lott: Executive Director of the Women’s League Child Development Center. She is also on the board of Aurora Women and Girls Foundation. Special thanks to our interns Lateshia Peters and Joey Morgan.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.